Is Go Guardian Invasive?

Senior+Liam+Carr%2C+Freshman+Jordan+Suess%2C+and+Freshman+Zac+Zarski+working+on+their+Journalism+stories+in+Mr.+Mueller%27s+classroom
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Is Go Guardian Invasive?

Senior Liam Carr, Freshman Jordan Suess, and Freshman Zac Zarski working on their Journalism stories in Mr. Mueller's classroom

Senior Liam Carr, Freshman Jordan Suess, and Freshman Zac Zarski working on their Journalism stories in Mr. Mueller's classroom

Senior Liam Carr, Freshman Jordan Suess, and Freshman Zac Zarski working on their Journalism stories in Mr. Mueller's classroom

Senior Liam Carr, Freshman Jordan Suess, and Freshman Zac Zarski working on their Journalism stories in Mr. Mueller's classroom

Jordan Suess, Staff Reporter

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     Students are shocked as their privacy has been invaded using a supposedly trusted classroom manager also known as “GoGuardian.” Freshman Zac Zarski has listed multiple occasions where a teacher had closed his tab while he was in the comfort of his own home. He has become very reluctant to use his personal computer when he is at his house.

     “If I were a parent, I would be outraged,” Zarski said. He has stated multiple times about how GoGuardian is quite invasive and should have a substantially lower amount of control over students. Zarski said he had always been wary about online sources collecting info for advertising and targeting purposes, but GoGuardian’s ability to give teachers access to what students are looking at after school hours has driven him away from using his Chromebook. He feels as though GoGuardian is not necessary and that it is the responsibility of students to be working on their assignments. If they are not, then they will suffer the consequences.

Science teacher Ginger Hendricks, a frequent user of the program, states that GoGuardian is a must for her classroom setting. “Before GoGuardian, I had to constantly walk around the room to make sure students were doing their work,” Hendricks stated. She said GoGuardian was bound to come based off of previous years where students would not use their class time to work on assignments.

     If used responsibly, GoGuardian a useful tool. Other schools such as Union public schools have their own form of GoGuardian where teachers can monitor student’s activity. Although teachers have been accused of using the program irresponsibly, generally teachers are trusted and only use GoGuardian for the set of students that are in their class at a specific time. Hendricks stated that she has the program set up to where she can only see what a set of students is looking at when they are in her class and her class only. She has said multiple times that although she has the ability to check a student’s activity on their computer after school hours, she does not have the desire to look.

     History, religion, and journalism teacher Taylor Mueller agrees that the program is necessary, as long as it is being used correctly and responsibly. Mueller personally does not have the desire to look at what students are doing out of class or over the weekend. Mueller said he occasionally checks on students that are behind to ensure they are on task even though they may not be in his class at the time. Just like Hendricks, Mueller agrees that GoGuardians addition to the Chromebooks was a long time coming.

     Is GoGuardian Intrusive? It all depends on how it is used. Most teachers such as Mueller and Hendricks are responsible enough to use it in class for not just themselves, but for the students benefit as well. It is very important for students to focus on their given assignments every day. Should GoGuardian affect what students do in the comfort of their own home? The common answer is no, just as long the student is using it responsibly. Teachers, however, can view the activity of Chromebooks when they want. After all, it is stated in the school policy.